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When do you Use the Words Do/Does/Did/Done?

Ok here is a Quick Tip to understand the difference between do/does/did/done:

Use 'did' for all things that are in the past.
Example: I did the work.
You did not care.
She did not work very hard.

Use 'do' after words like: I we, you, they
Example: I do like it.
We do want to join the party.
You do that job.
They do like it.

Use 'does' in sentences with words like: she/he/it/:
She does not like this.
He does not work anymore.
It does not print images.

I have created a worksheet to better understand these exercises. You can download and practice it. There is no need to print it. Here is the link. You can also download the exercise sheet from the free downloads page.
Author: Jims Varkey

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Author: Jims Varkey