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What is the difference between either or and neither nor?

The usage either …or…is used to express the fact that the speaker wants to choose between the two.

Here are two examples:
• I want either some coffee or tea.
• I like either that red dress or the blue one.

Some people use “either... or” in a negative way like the following:
• I don’t like either her aunt or her mother.
In sentences like these, it is better neither …nor

The same phrase can be used to make someone obey your commands.
 • You should either switch off the mobile or stop the vehicle.
 • She said: “Anna, either reduce the volume, or stop it altogether.”

Neither nor is used in a negative context. Use this expression when you do not want both the choice.
• I want neither coffee nor tea.
 • I like neither the red dress nor the blue one.

The same phrase can be used to mean that the person do not wish to obey a command.
• I will neither switch off my mobile phone, nor will I stop driving.
 • “Neither will I reduce the volume, nor will I stop playing it.” replied Anna.

Remember not to use neither nor in a sentence which already has a negative word.
 I don’t like neither her attitude, nor her style.
 I neither like her attitude, nor her style.


Author: Jims Varkey
-English Quick Tips Page

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What is the difference between 'there', 'they're' and 'their"?

The word "their" is used to mean something that belongs to a group of people. see the examples:

Where is their car?Look at their dirty shoes.Their marks were poor.
The word 'they're' is a shortened version of 'they are'. See the following sentences:

They are going to the park.I think, they are a bunch of idiots.

'There' is used to show a place.

I saw the thief over there.Let us search over there. 'There' is also used to mean something that exists: There are three chairs in the room.There is no place for us to sit.There is no shortcut to success.

Author: Jims Varkey
-English Quick Tips Page